Related Posts Widget for Blogs by LinkWithin

May 13, 2014

mediaite:

Bill Nye the Science Guy schools CNN on climate change

Well that was easy.

(Source: mediaite.com)

Comments (View)  |  199,210 notes


September 11, 2013

How to make a city great


It’s not an understatement to say that the future of the planet rests on cities. Carbon reduction, resiliency in the face of climate change, access to education and health care, economic justice … all are shaped by cities. It’s the reason Clinton created the C40 (now it’s more like the C100) — mayors and city councils can make a tremendous impact.

And it’s the number one reason I feel a purpose in my career. Dealing with global warming in other settings can be depressing. But when you’re dealing with it at the urban level, especially in a city like NYC, it’s actually kind of hopeful. (Doesn’t mean it’s not hella-frustrating though.)


Comments (View)  |  11 notes


August 28, 2013

fastcompany:

Headline: Rick Perry leaves a trail of death…

What if we named catastrophic hurricanes after climate change deniers?

Haha. Count me in.

Comments (View)  |  83 notes


August 27, 2013

Clotilde Dusoulier’s Seaweed Tartare (via food52):

Although we haven’t reached Japanese heights yet, seaweed consumption is increasingly common in France, and that’s not so surprising: the French love flavors from the sea, oysters are considered a supreme delicacy, and with such a wide coastline, the country offers plenty of opportunities to grow and harvest seaweed.

What have I been telling you?
Kelp is the new kale.
(And if the French are into it, it must be true.)

Clotilde Dusoulier’s Seaweed Tartare (via food52):

Although we haven’t reached Japanese heights yet, seaweed consumption is increasingly common in France, and that’s not so surprising: the French love flavors from the sea, oysters are considered a supreme delicacy, and with such a wide coastline, the country offers plenty of opportunities to grow and harvest seaweed.

What have I been telling you?

Kelp is the new kale.

(And if the French are into it, it must be true.)

Comments (View)  |  32 notes


August 22, 2013

motherjones:

Craziest thing you’ll see all day: a dozen cypress trees get swallowed up by a sinkhole.
Craziest thing you’ll read all day: the story of how the sinkhole got there.
(.gif by io9.)


“Bayou Corne is the biggest ongoing industrial disaster in the United States you haven’t heard of. In addition to creating a massive sinkhole, it has unearthed an uncomfortable truth: Modern mining and drilling techniques are disturbing the geological order in ways that scientists still don’t fully understand. Humans have been extracting natural resources from the earth since the dawn of mankind, but never before at the rate and magnitude of today’s petrochemical industry. And the side effects are becoming clear. It’s not just sinkholes and town-clearing natural gas leaks: Recently, the drilling process known as fracking has been linked to an increased risk of earthquakes.”

via apsies:

We are killing our planet and I really don’t think the majority cares enough to do something about it.

Not even close.

motherjones:

Craziest thing you’ll see all day: a dozen cypress trees get swallowed up by a sinkhole.

Craziest thing you’ll read all day: the story of how the sinkhole got there.

(.gif by io9.)

Bayou Corne is the biggest ongoing industrial disaster in the United States you haven’t heard of. In addition to creating a massive sinkhole, it has unearthed an uncomfortable truth: Modern mining and drilling techniques are disturbing the geological order in ways that scientists still don’t fully understand. Humans have been extracting natural resources from the earth since the dawn of mankind, but never before at the rate and magnitude of today’s petrochemical industry. And the side effects are becoming clear. It’s not just sinkholes and town-clearing natural gas leaks: Recently, the drilling process known as fracking has been linked to an increased risk of earthquakes.”

via apsies:

We are killing our planet and I really don’t think the majority cares enough to do something about it.

Not even close.

Comments (View)  |  2,467 notes


July 22, 2013

evoenyc:

Our kelp cocktails event, Drink Like A Fish, was written up in the July 22nd issue of The New Yorker’s Talk of the Town, and we really could not be prouder. It was a true joy to collaborate with ocean farmer Bren and Chef Dave — their dedication to their crafts and to building a sustainable food system are inspiring; their senses of humor make them plain awesome to be around.

Bren’s Kickstarter campaign — which will help him scale up his kelp operation, teach other fishermen the lessons he’s learned, and build a network of sustainable ocean farms — has been hugely successful (though you can always still chime in with your support).

Our task, now, is to eat what they grow, to vote with our forks, our dollars — even our cocktail shakers. 

PS: If you’re interested in attending future Evoe events, please join our mailing list.

!!!

Comments (View)  |  10 notes


July 2, 2013

cajunboy:

The fact that hurricane evacuation route maps are being distributed in New York is beyond fucking surreal to me.

I started my career (if you can call it that? ok yes you can call it that) in Nola right after Katrina, moved to New York and … several years later … just got off yet another call about planning for storm surges, extreme heat, and devastating wind (specifically, using big data and building systems/operators to make infrastructure more resilient). Couldn’t get too far from you, global warming, ya old bitch.

cajunboy:

The fact that hurricane evacuation route maps are being distributed in New York is beyond fucking surreal to me.

I started my career (if you can call it that? ok yes you can call it that) in Nola right after Katrina, moved to New York and … several years later … just got off yet another call about planning for storm surges, extreme heat, and devastating wind (specifically, using big data and building systems/operators to make infrastructure more resilient). Couldn’t get too far from you, global warming, ya old bitch.

Comments (View)  |  21 notes


June 12, 2013

3-D Ocean Farming: Saving Our Seas

Our friend Bren of Thimble Island Oyster Company has launched a Kickstarter campaign to scale up his innovative and sustainable “3D” approach to ocean farming, which makes the most of the water column by growing several different species of shellfish and kelp, from the seabed to the surface.

At Drink Like A Fish, we highlighted kelp’s nutrients and flavor — but it also restores depleted ecosystems, absorbs five times the carbon than land-based plants, and has huge potential as a biofuel. A network of kelp farms half the size of Maine could replace all the oil in the U.S. — incredible!

Bren has gotten a lot of media attention because what he’s doing is cutting-edge and truly brilliant — but in order to be world-changing, he needs our help. This campaign will help him get to a scale where he can establish kelp’s new place in our diets, our ecosystem, and our energy system, as well as teach his methods to other ocean farmers, building a blue-green economy, job by job.

As someone who has worked in sustainability for six years I can tell you — this is about as close to a magic bullet as we’re going to get.

I do hope you’ll join us in our support. And please spread the word!

Comments (View)  |  14 notes


May 7, 2013

Hey remember when M. and I used to do cocktail events? We’re doing ‘em again! If you’ll be in town over Memorial Day weekend, come join us on Saturday afternoon for kelp cocktails (kelp courtesy of our friend Bren) and snacks by Chef Dave of Louro and the supper club Um Segredo.
And if you can’t join us this time but want to stay in the loop on future events or private consulting/classes/events, please use our contact form here. Cheers!
evoenyc:

We’re delighted to announce that on Saturday, May 25th, we’re holding an Evoe cocktail event — the first in more than two years. Inspired by a trip to Brendan Smith’s innovative oyster and kelp farm, the Thimble Island Oyster Company, we’re featuring  kelp-infused spirits in a variety of cocktails.
We’re calling it (what else?) “Drink Like A Fish.”
Now, we know what you’re thinking….
Kelp cocktails? Really…?
Really!
Kelp and seaweed-infused spirits add appealing umami-rich flavors to both sweet and savory  cocktails . They’re especially fantastic with aquavit and carrot juice or mescal and sherry — all of which you’ll get to try.
Since we like to offer a bit of education with our aperitifs, we’ll discuss the principles of incorporating unusual ingredients in your cocktail repertoire, so that next time you find some interesting new liqueur on your travels you’ll be able to mix it fearlessly with the spirits you already have in your home bar.
As for Brendan, he’s a rock star of the local and sustainable seafood movement — if don’t believe us, check out The Wall Street Journal and Lucky Peach — and he’ll tell us about his unique “3D” approach to ocean farming and why we should all be eating more kelp, in cocktails and beyond.
Finally, Chef Dave Santos of the acclaimed West Village restaurant Louro will create an inspired menu of kelp and seaweed snacks.
The details:
You must RSVP and space is limited, so please email us at info@evoenyc.com if you’d like to join us.
Price: $45. Includes a variety of kelp and seaweed cocktails by Mayur and snacks by Chef Dave.
Location: Louro, 142 West 10th Street, West Village.
Date & time: Saturday, May 25th, 2-4 pm (note: this is Memorial Day weekend).
Please note! We’re offering cocktail consulting services for both the professional and private client; please see our new website for more information.

Hey remember when M. and I used to do cocktail events? We’re doing ‘em again! If you’ll be in town over Memorial Day weekend, come join us on Saturday afternoon for kelp cocktails (kelp courtesy of our friend Bren) and snacks by Chef Dave of Louro and the supper club Um Segredo.

And if you can’t join us this time but want to stay in the loop on future events or private consulting/classes/events, please use our contact form here. Cheers!

evoenyc:

We’re delighted to announce that on Saturday, May 25th, we’re holding an Evoe cocktail event — the first in more than two years. Inspired by a trip to Brendan Smith’s innovative oyster and kelp farm, the Thimble Island Oyster Company, we’re featuring kelp-infused spirits in a variety of cocktails.

We’re calling it (what else?) “Drink Like A Fish.”

Now, we know what you’re thinking….

Kelp cocktails? Really…?

Really!

Kelp and seaweed-infused spirits add appealing umami-rich flavors to both sweet and savory cocktails . They’re especially fantastic with aquavit and carrot juice or mescal and sherry — all of which you’ll get to try.

Since we like to offer a bit of education with our aperitifs, we’ll discuss the principles of incorporating unusual ingredients in your cocktail repertoire, so that next time you find some interesting new liqueur on your travels you’ll be able to mix it fearlessly with the spirits you already have in your home bar.

As for Brendan, he’s a rock star of the local and sustainable seafood movement — if don’t believe us, check out The Wall Street Journal and Lucky Peach — and he’ll tell us about his unique “3D” approach to ocean farming and why we should all be eating more kelp, in cocktails and beyond.

Finally, Chef Dave Santos of the acclaimed West Village restaurant Louro will create an inspired menu of kelp and seaweed snacks.

The details:
  • You must RSVP and space is limited, so please email us at info@evoenyc.com if you’d like to join us.
  • Price: $45. Includes a variety of kelp and seaweed cocktails by Mayur and snacks by Chef Dave.
  • Location: Louro, 142 West 10th Street, West Village.
  • Date & time: Saturday, May 25th, 2-4 pm (note: this is Memorial Day weekend).
Please note! We’re offering cocktail consulting services for both the professional and private client; please see our new website for more information.
Comments (View)  |  18 notes


April 29, 2013

Broad­way: 1000 Steps

Mary Miss is an artist whose work seeks new means of engag­ing the pub­lic in the world around us. In the course of her career she has expanded from tem­po­rary site instal­la­tions to larger scale trans­for­ma­tions of infra­struc­ture. She’s cur­rently work­ing on an ambi­tious project for New York City called “Broad­way: 1000 Steps,” that will explain New York’s new green ini­tia­tives — many of them part of PlaNYC –at mul­ti­ple sites along Broad­way. The goal is to make New York’s for­ward progress even more tan­gi­ble to citizens.

Mary Miss explains:

I thought if artists, over a period of time, could incre­men­tally work on this cor­ri­dor, peo­ple could begin to see the city not just as the home of Wall Street, not just a 19th or 20th cen­tury place, but really a city that’s look­ing to the future. I also thought it would really be an inter­est­ing way to get the ini­tia­tives of the city’s PlaNYC down at the street level so that peo­ple could have access and begin to under­stand issues that were being talked about between city depart­ments. How do you get the sup­port of citizens?


As I understand it, we will soon be seeing installations along Broadway that highlight the unseen or unnoticed efforts toward sustainability that are right under our feet or above our heads — the green roofs, the LEED buildings, composting, urban farming (or potential places for urban farming). Keep your eyes peeled….

Broad­way: 1000 Steps

Mary Miss is an artist whose work seeks new means of engag­ing the pub­lic in the world around us. In the course of her career she has expanded from tem­po­rary site instal­la­tions to larger scale trans­for­ma­tions of infra­struc­ture. She’s cur­rently work­ing on an ambi­tious project for New York City called “Broad­way: 1000 Steps,” that will explain New York’s new green ini­tia­tives — many of them part of PlaNYC –at mul­ti­ple sites along Broad­way. The goal is to make New York’s for­ward progress even more tan­gi­ble to citizens.

Mary Miss explains:

I thought if artists, over a period of time, could incre­men­tally work on this cor­ri­dor, peo­ple could begin to see the city not just as the home of Wall Street, not just a 19th or 20th cen­tury place, but really a city that’s look­ing to the future. I also thought it would really be an inter­est­ing way to get the ini­tia­tives of the city’s PlaNYC down at the street level so that peo­ple could have access and begin to under­stand issues that were being talked about between city depart­ments. How do you get the sup­port of citizens?

As I understand it, we will soon be seeing installations along Broadway that highlight the unseen or unnoticed efforts toward sustainability that are right under our feet or above our heads — the green roofs, the LEED buildings, composting, urban farming (or potential places for urban farming). Keep your eyes peeled….

Comments (View)  |  9 notes