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July 13, 2014

heroes-get-made said: You know Born in the USA isn't a patriotic song, right? I mean, it's a great song, but a lot of people misunderstand it.

fuckyeahtheboss:

it’s patriotic in that it speaks about the country in an honest way. you don’t have to blindly praise your country to be patriotic. it’s a protest song, but a protest song can be patriotic.

The highest form of American patriotism is Bruce Springsteen.

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April 25, 2014

God bless this writer.
kateoplis:

“Brent Roske lives on a 45-foot yacht off the coast of Marina del Rey, which is technically on the Pacific Ocean, but for jurisdictional purposes is considered part of the city of Los Angeles and, more to the point, the 33rd Congressional District of California. …Roske, who is 39, is part of a field of 18 candidates hoping to represent the heartland of Beverly Hills, Malibu and Bel-Air in the United States Congress.
A former creative director at NBC Universal, Roske is not without assets… Should Roske get elected, he already has some bold ideas. He plans, for instance, to hire a film crew to document his every move in office. “People have a right,” he says, “to know what their elected representatives are doing.”
"[T]he existing field reflects the vibrant collection of humanity that resides in California 33. …You’ve most likely not heard of any of them except Marianne Williamson, the self-help guru, who dislikes being called a “self-help guru.” (Her spokesman has suggested the term “thought leader.”) Williamson has spoken of turning our political dialogue into “a conversation of the heart.” Katy Perry shows up at her events, as do multiple Kardashians. Kim officially endorsed her in a blog post just before press time. Williamson also received the support of Alanis Morissette, Nicole Richie and, for added sex appeal, Dennis Kucinich.”
"She pounds the theme in house parties throughout the district. The parties are filled with devoted readers and acolytes — Eva Longorias and Grammy winners and a woman from “Glee” — who make up her political base. Heads bob when Williamson discusses money. “The House of Representatives was supposed to be where the shopkeeper could come in and the candlemaker could come in,” she says, but now it is a servant of only the mega-financed. And where else but here, in this fertile crescent of American possibility, could a very wealthy spiritual guru who does not like to be called a spiritual guru go on to become a 21st-century version of the iconic candlemaker-leader that the founders envisioned?
“When I started my career, 20 years ago, my conversation seemed fringe,” Williamson said. “Today that fringe is baked into the cake. You are fringe if you don’t know what it is. You’re the one who looks silly today if you don’t have some understanding of some integrated holistic perspective on life.” …
“This is not just a political issue but a spiritual one,” Williamson told me, and I believed that she believed that. If a society factors an issue only through economics, she went on, “rather than ‘How are the kids?’ ‘Am I harmful to anyone or anything?’ ‘Am I an instrument of good, of higher purpose?’ ” we could end up, in her words, becoming members of some sociopathic new world order. “And a sociopath has no conscience,” she said. “A sociopath has no remorse.”
The Real House Candidates of Beverly Hills

God bless this writer.

kateoplis:

Brent Roske lives on a 45-foot yacht off the coast of Marina del Rey, which is technically on the Pacific Ocean, but for jurisdictional purposes is considered part of the city of Los Angeles and, more to the point, the 33rd Congressional District of California. …Roske, who is 39, is part of a field of 18 candidates hoping to represent the heartland of Beverly Hills, Malibu and Bel-Air in the United States Congress.

A former creative director at NBC Universal, Roske is not without assets… Should Roske get elected, he already has some bold ideas. He plans, for instance, to hire a film crew to document his every move in office. “People have a right,” he says, “to know what their elected representatives are doing.”

"[T]he existing field reflects the vibrant collection of humanity that resides in California 33. …You’ve most likely not heard of any of them except Marianne Williamson, the self-help guru, who dislikes being called a “self-help guru.” (Her spokesman has suggested the term “thought leader.”) Williamson has spoken of turning our political dialogue into “a conversation of the heart.” Katy Perry shows up at her events, as do multiple Kardashians. Kim officially endorsed her in a blog post just before press time. Williamson also received the support of Alanis Morissette, Nicole Richie and, for added sex appeal, Dennis Kucinich.”

"She pounds the theme in house parties throughout the district. The parties are filled with devoted readers and acolytes — Eva Longorias and Grammy winners and a woman from “Glee” — who make up her political base. Heads bob when Williamson discusses money. “The House of Representatives was supposed to be where the shopkeeper could come in and the candlemaker could come in,” she says, but now it is a servant of only the mega-financed. And where else but here, in this fertile crescent of American possibility, could a very wealthy spiritual guru who does not like to be called a spiritual guru go on to become a 21st-century version of the iconic candlemaker-leader that the founders envisioned?

“When I started my career, 20 years ago, my conversation seemed fringe,” Williamson said. “Today that fringe is baked into the cake. You are fringe if you don’t know what it is. You’re the one who looks silly today if you don’t have some understanding of some integrated holistic perspective on life.” …

“This is not just a political issue but a spiritual one,” Williamson told me, and I believed that she believed that. If a society factors an issue only through economics, she went on, “rather than ‘How are the kids?’ ‘Am I harmful to anyone or anything?’ ‘Am I an instrument of good, of higher purpose?’ ” we could end up, in her words, becoming members of some sociopathic new world order. “And a sociopath has no conscience,” she said. “A sociopath has no remorse.”

The Real House Candidates of Beverly Hills

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April 7, 2014

#NotABugSplat: “A giant art installation project that targets predator drone operators sitting thousands of miles away who refer to kills as BugSplats. Now they’ll see a child’s face instead.”
… so who can get one of these installed on the ceiling of Obama’s bedroom?
(via wreckandsalvage:jomc)

#NotABugSplat: “A giant art installation project that targets predator drone operators sitting thousands of miles away who refer to kills as BugSplats. Now they’ll see a child’s face instead.”

… so who can get one of these installed on the ceiling of Obama’s bedroom?

(via wreckandsalvage:jomc)

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February 15, 2014

Ellen Page’s speech at HRCF’S Time to Thrive Conference (viabeenthinking:kaeandlucy)

You’ve already heard she came out, but you still need to watch her deliver this knockout speech. Tears.

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February 14, 2014

You have to act as if it were possible to radically transform the world. And you have to do it all the time.

Angela Davis - from a lecture delivered at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. February 13th, 2014. (via ninjaruski)

Ms. Davis has been on my mind of late. 

(via wreckandsalvage)

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December 28, 2013

Hey, did you know Bill Clinton is swearing in de Blasio on Jan. 1st?

Pretty effin’ neat.

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December 20, 2013

What the Pentagon Bought in 2012 (via azspot)

$16 million on badges and insignia!

Badges are so hot right now.

What the Pentagon Bought in 2012 (via azspot)

$16 million on badges and insignia!

Badges are so hot right now.

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December 20, 2013

unforgettabledetritus:

In 1968, during the administration of US President Lyndon B. Johnson, Eartha Kitt encountered a substantial professional setback after she made anti-war statements during a White House luncheon. Kitt was invited to the White House luncheon and was asked by Lady Bird Johnson about the Vietnam War. She replied: “You send the best of this country off to be shot and maimed. No wonder the kids rebel and take pot.”

During a question and answer session, Kitt stated:

The children of America are not rebelling for no reason. They are not hippies for no reason at all. We don’t have what we have on Sunset Blvd. for no reason. They are rebelling against something. There are so many things burning the people of this country, particularly mothers. They feel they are going to raise sons — and I know what it’s like, and you have children of your own, Mrs. Johnson — we raise children and send them to war.

Her remarks reportedly caused Mrs. Johnson to burst into tears and led to a derailment in Kitt’s career

(Source: napoleon--in--rags)

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December 11, 2013

apsies:

Aboard Air Force One, former President Bush shows photos of his paintings to, from left, First Lady Michelle Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Valerie Jarrett, National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice, Attorney General Eric Holder and former First Lady Laura Bush, Dec. 9, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Awww look how bashful and proud he is!
Pity he didn’t find his calling, I dunno, fourteen years ago.

apsies:

Aboard Air Force One, former President Bush shows photos of his paintings to, from left, First Lady Michelle Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Valerie Jarrett, National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice, Attorney General Eric Holder and former First Lady Laura Bush, Dec. 9, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Awww look how bashful and proud he is!

Pity he didn’t find his calling, I dunno, fourteen years ago.

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December 6, 2013

Nobody needs my thoughts on Mandela’s passing but the political is personal and in this case, very much so.
I remember my dad sitting me in front of the TV to watch the news coverage of a smiling old African man being freed from prison amid a throng of a million more smiling people.
I didn’t connect him to the summer two years before, when I was seven and my dad went to Africa.
I didn’t connect him to Mavis Beacon, the fictional character who taught me typing.
I didn’t quite cotton to the fact that Mandela was a leader of the ANC, though I did know daddy was working for the ANC when he was in Africa (for some reason, for years and years, I thought he went to Zimbabwe, not South Africa Zambia. I think I just liked the word. EDIT: Shelley just reminded me it was Zambia, because they were in exile from South Africa. My legendary memory strikes again).
What I knew was that the men that daddy taught computer skills in Africa (somewhere in Africa) for the ANC liked Mavis Beacon because she was beautiful and black. I kind of hated her because I was terrible at typing and my windshield was immediately covered with bug-splats (please tell me you know what I’m talking about), but that really wasn’t Mavis Beacon’s fault.
And moreover, I just typed this in less than three minutes, probably 15 errors total (I’m fast with the backspace), and my colleagues constantly comment on how fast my little fingers fly over the keys. So thanks, Miss Mavis.
And moreover, I can listen to the coverage of his death and think about what it meant that my dad devoted a couple months of his life to the organization that was keeping Mandela’s flame alive all those terrible years.
Let us not forget. America considered the ANC a terrorist organization at the time. America — Saint Ronald in particular — was on the wrong side of history.
But thank god, most Americans weren’t. Thanks god, the arc of justice is as strong as it is. Thank god for people like those men, those women, my daddy, and, of course, Mandela.

Nobody needs my thoughts on Mandela’s passing but the political is personal and in this case, very much so.

I remember my dad sitting me in front of the TV to watch the news coverage of a smiling old African man being freed from prison amid a throng of a million more smiling people.

I didn’t connect him to the summer two years before, when I was seven and my dad went to Africa.

I didn’t connect him to Mavis Beacon, the fictional character who taught me typing.

I didn’t quite cotton to the fact that Mandela was a leader of the ANC, though I did know daddy was working for the ANC when he was in Africa (for some reason, for years and years, I thought he went to Zimbabwe, not South Africa Zambia. I think I just liked the word. EDIT: Shelley just reminded me it was Zambia, because they were in exile from South Africa. My legendary memory strikes again).

What I knew was that the men that daddy taught computer skills in Africa (somewhere in Africa) for the ANC liked Mavis Beacon because she was beautiful and black. I kind of hated her because I was terrible at typing and my windshield was immediately covered with bug-splats (please tell me you know what I’m talking about), but that really wasn’t Mavis Beacon’s fault.

And moreover, I just typed this in less than three minutes, probably 15 errors total (I’m fast with the backspace), and my colleagues constantly comment on how fast my little fingers fly over the keys. So thanks, Miss Mavis.

And moreover, I can listen to the coverage of his death and think about what it meant that my dad devoted a couple months of his life to the organization that was keeping Mandela’s flame alive all those terrible years.

Let us not forget. America considered the ANC a terrorist organization at the time. America — Saint Ronald in particular — was on the wrong side of history.

But thank god, most Americans weren’t. Thanks god, the arc of justice is as strong as it is. Thank god for people like those men, those women, my daddy, and, of course, Mandela.

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