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September 8, 2014

Dark ‘n’ Stormy Bundt Cake

Rum (or whiskey) in cake adds so much moisture. (Butter doesn’t hurt, either.) This recipe looks fantastic.

fritesandfries:

Dark 'n' Stormy Bundt Cake | Frites & Fries

I’ve never put so much damn butter in a cake but I do not regret it.

Dark 'n' Stormy Bundt Cake | Frites & Fries

Please don’t think about the calories. This bundt cake is worth trying because it has ginger beer and rum — just like a Dark & Stormy cocktail.

Dark 'n' Stormy Bundt Cake | Frites & Fries

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August 19, 2014

This sounds far more fantastic than “clam dip” has any right to sound.
luckypeach:

Hugh Merwin is the senior editor of Grub Street and wrote the article “Shell Station” in The Seashore Issue, in which he surveys eight different types of clams. Here, he shares his recipe for clam dip.
Take it away, Hugh:
I grew up working in a sort of broken-down clam bar on Long Island’s Great South Bay. One summer we took over the adjoining fish market—we just knocked a big hole in the wall with sledgehammers to connect the two spaces—and in the rubble I found a stack of old promotional recipe cards with instructions for the original Kraft Music Hall Clam Dip, which reportedly caused a shortage of canned clams in Manhattan the moment it was published in the 1950s. I replaced canned clams with fresh steamers, Worcestershire with some funky Roman-style garum. It was actually amazing, especially after letting the chilled and mixed ingredients mingle for a while. —Hugh Merwin
Clam Dip
Makes around 1 3/4 cups
18 littleneck or topneck clams, steamed in 1/4 cup of water, cooled, and shucked6 tablespoons clam cooking liquidJuice of one lemon 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt1/2 teaspoon garum or Thai fish sauce4 dashes Angostura bitters8 ounces good-quality cream cheeseWhite pepper to taste
1. Combine clams, cooking liquid, lemon juice, salt, garum or fish sauce, and bitters in a food processor. Pulse until clams are rough-chopped and ingredients are blended. Add cream cheese and pulse, occasionally scraping down sides of food processor with spatula, until everything is smooth. Add white pepper to taste. Clam dip is best after it sits, refrigerated, for a few hours. Serve with sturdy potato chips. 

This sounds far more fantastic than “clam dip” has any right to sound.

luckypeach:

Hugh Merwin is the senior editor of Grub Street and wrote the article “Shell Station” in The Seashore Issue, in which he surveys eight different types of clams. Here, he shares his recipe for clam dip.

Take it away, Hugh:

I grew up working in a sort of broken-down clam bar on Long Island’s Great South Bay. One summer we took over the adjoining fish market—we just knocked a big hole in the wall with sledgehammers to connect the two spaces—and in the rubble I found a stack of old promotional recipe cards with instructions for the original Kraft Music Hall Clam Dip, which reportedly caused a shortage of canned clams in Manhattan the moment it was published in the 1950s. I replaced canned clams with fresh steamers, Worcestershire with some funky Roman-style garum. It was actually amazing, especially after letting the chilled and mixed ingredients mingle for a while. —Hugh Merwin

Clam Dip

Makes around 1 3/4 cups

18 littleneck or topneck clams, steamed in 1/4 cup of water, cooled, and shucked
6 tablespoons clam cooking liquid
Juice of one lemon 
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon garum or Thai fish sauce
4 dashes Angostura bitters
8 ounces good-quality cream cheese
White pepper to taste

1. Combine clams, cooking liquid, lemon juice, salt, garum or fish sauce, and bitters in a food processor. Pulse until clams are rough-chopped and ingredients are blended. Add cream cheese and pulse, occasionally scraping down sides of food processor with spatula, until everything is smooth. Add white pepper to taste. Clam dip is best after it sits, refrigerated, for a few hours. Serve with sturdy potato chips. 

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August 6, 2014

The recipe for the infamous almond macadamia milk at LA’s Go Get ‘Em Tiger. They say it’s the ideal nut milk for iced coffee. (Though I love me some local cow milk and, as one of the apparently few adults in America with zero food intolerances, I will continue to do my part to support the industry. Same goes for you, Big Gluten.)

The recipe for the infamous almond macadamia milk at LA’s Go Get ‘Em Tiger. They say it’s the ideal nut milk for iced coffee. (Though I love me some local cow milk and, as one of the apparently few adults in America with zero food intolerances, I will continue to do my part to support the industry. Same goes for you, Big Gluten.)

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July 23, 2014

georgiaisyourfriend:

My fascination and irritation with #mymancancook posts has taken a turn and is now a full-blow obsession.
Follow my new Tumblr, Your Man Can’t Cook, for breakdowns of my favorite “my man can cook” posts. 

M. and I just spent 10 minutes on this blog (which kills me). He wanted to cut the men (and women) involved some slack; at least they tried blah blah blah. I wouldn’t hear of it. The food is gross; the sexist sentiment behind it even grosser (right up there with ‘aww my husband watched the kids today isn’t he the greatest?’).
"But what do you say about my cooking?" he asked.
"Darling, if you have to say your man can cook, he can’t cook."
Besides, his food speaks for itself.
PS: And oh god that stir-fried rat? Cannot be unseen. A+ work, Georgia.

georgiaisyourfriend:

My fascination and irritation with #mymancancook posts has taken a turn and is now a full-blow obsession.

Follow my new Tumblr, Your Man Can’t Cook, for breakdowns of my favorite “my man can cook” posts. 

M. and I just spent 10 minutes on this blog (which kills me). He wanted to cut the men (and women) involved some slack; at least they tried blah blah blah. I wouldn’t hear of it. The food is gross; the sexist sentiment behind it even grosser (right up there with ‘aww my husband watched the kids today isn’t he the greatest?’).

"But what do you say about my cooking?" he asked.

"Darling, if you have to say your man can cook, he can’t cook."

Besides, his food speaks for itself.

PS: And oh god that stir-fried rat? Cannot be unseen. A+ work, Georgia.

(via alieandgeorgia)

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July 13, 2014

More summer eating inspiration (because the days will pass, we might as well enjoy them).

gasp-shock:

Summer sides for days! I’ve been slowly working through these caprese alternatives as the produce appears at the farmer’s market or as burrata and peaches are on sale on the SAME DAY at Whole Foods. (Enablers!)

  • Cantaloupe + Scamorza + Mint
  • Grilled Eggplant + Ricotta Salata + Dill
  • Peach + Burrata + Tarragon
  • Roasted Red Pepper + Feta + Chive

(via tktc)

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July 13, 2014

tktc:

Green Gazpacho from Bon Appetit is delicious. Omitted the bread and, I reasoned, 2-3 hours of soak time. It’s real good. Great kick from the jalapeños and vinegar but tastes really rich thanks to the yogurt. Plus that’s all it is—vegetables, a couple acids, and Greek yogurt. 

To make before summer is through.
And side note, this is the first summer in my life that I am counting down the days and waiting to pass. November 9th — our due date — feels so far away (though of course I know it isn’t). These 9 and a half months are as long as a school year, and feel just as interminable.

tktc:

Green Gazpacho from Bon Appetit is delicious. Omitted the bread and, I reasoned, 2-3 hours of soak time. It’s real good. Great kick from the jalapeños and vinegar but tastes really rich thanks to the yogurt. Plus that’s all it is—vegetables, a couple acids, and Greek yogurt. 

To make before summer is through.

And side note, this is the first summer in my life that I am counting down the days and waiting to pass. November 9th — our due date — feels so far away (though of course I know it isn’t). These 9 and a half months are as long as a school year, and feel just as interminable.

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July 13, 2014

Summer Sweet Corn Recipes on Saveur (via food52)
Fabulous food photography.

Summer Sweet Corn Recipes on Saveur (via food52)

Fabulous food photography.

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July 1, 2014

Your summer shot (have one for me)
Last night we met this cool couple — she’s an interior designer who creates large-scale installations, both artistic and commercial, he’s a DJ who’s worked at the French Laundry and Bouley (as you do).
He made all the best dips and condiments at the BBQ (says he was raised white trash, and I guess it shows): killer queso with like 40 ingredients (including beer and pineapple), caramelized Coca-Cola onions for topping hot dogs and bratwurst (omg), and pickled jalapeño pineapples, for munching, eating with chips and queso, topping brats, whatever. But the best use — pineapple pickling liquid + whiskey = piñabacks. You heard it here first.
Make your own pickled jalapeño pineapples by adapting this recipe. I’d probably skip the other spices and just include slices of jalapeño or habanero. 
And I found a couple recipes for Coke onions, if you want to give those a shot. 
Look into my eyes and listen to me closely: you probably do.

Your summer shot (have one for me)

Last night we met this cool couple — she’s an interior designer who creates large-scale installations, both artistic and commercial, he’s a DJ who’s worked at the French Laundry and Bouley (as you do).

He made all the best dips and condiments at the BBQ (says he was raised white trash, and I guess it shows): killer queso with like 40 ingredients (including beer and pineapple), caramelized Coca-Cola onions for topping hot dogs and bratwurst (omg), and pickled jalapeño pineapples, for munching, eating with chips and queso, topping brats, whatever. But the best use — pineapple pickling liquid + whiskey = piñabacks. You heard it here first.

Make your own pickled jalapeño pineapples by adapting this recipe. I’d probably skip the other spices and just include slices of jalapeño or habanero. 

And I found a couple recipes for Coke onions, if you want to give those a shot.

Look into my eyes and listen to me closely: you probably do.

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June 11, 2014

food52:

Here’s how to tackle the most daunting task in baking.

Read More: How to Fold Egg Whites Into a Batter on The Kitchn

(via mickey-magical)

One of my favorite moments in one of my favorite childhood movies. Also, I learned to cook by mastering souffles. Probably not a coincidence.

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June 6, 2014

One of the Great Foods. (via huffposttaste)

(And do not try to pass that horrible sponge cake version off on me. I was raised better than that!)

(Source: biconcave)

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